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seminars:comb:start

Combinatorics Seminar

SPRING 2020

Directions to the department.

Organizers: Laura Anderson, Michael Dobbins, Benjamin Schröter, and Thomas Zaslavsky.

  • Tuesday, January 21
    Virtual Combinatorics Colloquium
    Speaker: Matjaz Konvalinka (Ljubljana)
    Title: The First Bijective Proof of the ASM Theorem
    Time: 2:00 - 3:00 (Note special time), preceded by a brief organizational meeting at 1:40
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, January 28
    Speaker: No meeting today; we're all too busy.

  • Tuesday, February 4
    Speaker: Laura Anderson (Binghamton)
    Title: A Charming Conjecture Coming From Mathematical Psychology
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

    In joint work with John Dunn I've been trying to establish whether two types of psychological model are actually equivalent. The problem reduces to a simple, purely combinatorial question about patterns among inequalities in a rectangular array of numbers. I don't know the answer to the question: this talk is my shameless effort to recruit some help.

  • Tuesday, February 11
    Speaker: Michael Dobbins (Binghamton)
    Title: The Real RAM Analogue to the Cook--Levin Theorem
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

    In “A Framework for robust realistic geometric computations” by Erickson, van der Hoog, and Miltzow, the authors introduce a real analog of NP defined as those decision problems where every positive instance has a witness consisting of both bits and real numbers that can be verified in polynomial time in the real RAM model of computation. They show that such a problem can be reduced in polynomial time on a Turing machine to deciding whether a multivariate polynomial formula has a real solution. This is analogous to the Cook–Levin Theorem, which shows that every problem in NP can be reduced in polynomial time to deciding whether a Boolean formula has a satisfying assignment.

  • Tuesday, February 18
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, February 25
    Speaker: Ed Swartz (Cornell)
    Title: Polymatroids are to Finite Groups as Matroids are to Finite Fields
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

    In 1935 Whitney introduced matroids as a combinatorial abstraction of linear independence. Since then there has been a strong connection between matroids, and the geometry and combinatorics of finite dimensional vector spaces over finite fields. Polymatroids are a very simply defined generalization of matroids. I will try to convince the audience that the title is nowhere near as crazy as it sounds. I will take classic examples of how matroids and vector spaces over finite fields interact, and show that they are special cases of how polymatroids and finite groups interact.

  • Tuesday, March 3
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, March 10
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, March 17
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, March 24
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, March 31
    Speaker:Lionel Levine (Cornell)
    Title:TBA
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, April 14
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, April 21
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Saturday, April 25, 2020
    DISCRETE MATHEMATICS DAY at the University at Albany

  • Tuesday, April 28
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E

  • Tuesday, May 5
    Speaker:
    Title:
    Time: 1:15 - 2:15
    Room: WH-100E



Anticipated Future Talks

seminars/comb/start.txt · Last modified: 2020/02/12 08:54 by laura